The

DEAN’S MESSAGE

DEPT. NEWS

Welcome to the May edition of our eNewsletter. With our spring commencement exercise recently completed, we are excited to watch our new graduates excel and help shape the future of both industry and academia.

We had 440 graduates, with 15 receiving doctoral degrees, 39 receiving master’s degrees, and 386 receiving bachelor’s degrees. Throughout their education at BYU, these men and women have been well prepared to blaze new trails in their chosen fields—thanks to hours of classroom instruction and a variety of mentored research opportunities.

These graduates have begun moving on to exciting opportunities that will undoubtedly allow them to expand their horizons and magnify their influence. Some of our students are starting work at prestigious organizations while others will seek advanced degrees from some of the world’s finest academic institutions.

The college is proud of these students and the work they performed during their time at BYU. We are eager to watch them put their education to work and contribute to our changing world.

Graduation exercises provide a valuable opportunity for me to reflect on our continued commitment to excellent teaching and research, carried out in an environment of faith—a commitment we renew with each new semester.

Without outstanding faculty and programs, a BYU degree might mean very little. Yet our graduates can step out into the world confident that they have received quality training and instruction from an outstanding college.

As alumni, you are already well aware of the great education CPMS offers. We’d like to hear from you about where your degree has taken you. Please email cpms@byu.edu with any news about your career or your family. We’ll be publishing these in the upcoming issue of Frontiers.

We truly appreciate hearing from you and wish you all the best.

COLLEGE
CPMS Convocation
CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY
Chem Open Lab Day
Izatt-Christensen Lecture
COMPUTER SCIENCE
Animation Center Earns Another Student Emmy
GEOLOGY
TedxBYU
MATHEMATICS
CURM Earns AMS Award
PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY
Search for Life in the Asteroid Belt
Astrofest
STATISTICS
Statistics of a Champion
COLLEGE LINKS
CPMS Homepage
Giving to the College
CPMS on Facebook
CPMS on Twitter
LinkedIn
CPMStv
   


Dr. Benjamin Pykles presented the 2015 Quey Hebrew Lecture.

Dr. Benjamin Pykles: Bearing Witness through the Past

During his career, Dr. Benjamin Pykles has uncovered ruins of the 1910s in Iosepa, Utah and researched the rise of historical archeology of the 1930s. Now he’s using his skills to uncover the past of the pioneers in the early nineteenth century.

Pykles, as part of the Department of Geological Sciences’ Quey Hebrew Memorial Lecture, illustrated the value of remote-sensing technologies ranging from specially-trained canines to ground-penetrating radar at the Priesthood Restoration Site, Historic Nauvoo, Haun’s Mill, Far West Burial Grounds, and the original Provo Tabernacle.

Pykles started his presentation by talking about his work at the Haun’s Mill Massacre Site and the Far West Burial Grounds, both in Missouri. The two projects are still in progress, and the two sites have offered ideal opportunities to test a variety of new technologies.

“We set out to investigate this eighty-acre parcel [the Far West Burial Grounds] using a variety of remote-sensing techniques,” Pykles said. “We used some very specially trained dogs, magnetometry, and ground-penetrating radar. We followed that with excavations.”

“A lot of people wonder why the Church places such importance, time, and resources into restoring these sites, Pykles said.

Read more of this story here.

CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY | COMPUTER SCIENCE | GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES
MATHEMATICS | MATHEMATICS EDUCATION | PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY | STATISTICS

For more information about the college, contact Lynn Patten at lynn_patten@byu.edu.
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