The

DEAN’S MESSAGE

DEPT. NEWS

It’s hard to believe, but the new year has already arrived, and along with it this year’s first eNewsletter! I hope that you had a wonderful holiday season full of new, warm memories.

The start of every year is the perfect time to reflect on the things we’ve accomplished and to set new goals for the new year. Here at CPMS, we certainly have had an eventful twelve months, and this next year is already shaping up to be an exceptional one.

Thinking back, it’s amazing to see the many ways that CPMS has changed over the years, and the many memories that have been created within the college. Certainly we can all remember the many stressful, perhaps sometimes comical, hours we spent here. Maybe a lab mishap left you missing an eyebrow, or maybe you fell victim to a friend’s failed experiment. Perhaps your lab experiences were more meaningful to you and your research. No matter what area of science we specialized in, we’ve all experienced the ups and downs of working with lab equipment as a student!

In fact, we would love to hear about your memorable experiences while you were studying at BYU. Please email us your anecdotes (up to 200 words) at cpms@byu.edu, with “Memory Bytes,” in the

subject line. We’ll publish the best stories in the next issue of Frontiers, the college alumni magazine.

As part of the new year, we also have pledged to maintain the highest standard of excellence at the college in order to keep BYU’s environment conducive to providing experiences that result in these cherished memories. After all, those memories are what make the BYU experience so special.

To that end, we are very excited to announce this year’s Izatt-Christensen lecture. World-renowned chemical engineer Robert Langer, from MIT, will be lecturing on February 6 and 7, 2013. The general session will be on February 6 at 4 p.m. in the JSB Auditorium, and the more technical session will be on the following day at 11 a.m. in W111 of the Benson Building. We are honored to have this brilliant scholar—named one of the 100 most important people in America—speak to us this year.

As we move forward into 2013, we will continue to keep you updated about our activities and progress. Thank you for being a part of our college family and for your continued support.

CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY
World Famous Chemist to Speak
MATHEMATICS
Mad Skills + Killer Test = Mathlete
PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY
These Sounds Are Sure to Astound
COLLEGE LINKS
CPMS Homepage
Giving to the College
CPMS on Facebook
CPMS on Twitter
LinkedIn
CPMStv
FRONTIERS MAGAZINE
Fall/Winter 2012 Issue & Videos

CPMS-TV VIDEO
SPS: Unbelievable Bed of Nails

   


Photo: courtesy of Michael Dorff

 


FORMULA FOR MENTORING

This year, Professor Michael Dorff of the Mathematics Department will receive the Lawrence K. Egbert Teaching and Learning Faculty Fellowship award.

The teaching and learning fellowship award, which has only existed for a few years, was created to recognize faculty members that have made a significant impact in the area of mentored learning.

Professor Dorff, who has been teaching at BYU for 12 years, was nominated and eventually selected as the recipient because of his extensive involvement in mentoring undergraduate students and helping professors explore similar mentoring opportunities.

As part of Professor Dorff’s efforts to improve undergraduate research, he received a $1.26 million NSF grant in 2006 to create and direct the BYU-sponsored Center for Undergraduate Research in Mathematics (CURM). NSF has since renewed funding of the program with another $1.28 million grant to continue the successful project.

Dorff explains the purpose of this organization. “It is used to take the BYU model for mentoring and share it with professors and students at other institutions. CURM trains and offers financial support to these professors and students.”

Professor Dorff is very excited to continue working with students on a regular basis. Sometimes at a university, especially one the size of BYU, it’s difficult to maintain a close student-professor relationship. However, “when you are a mentor,” says Dorff, “you really get to know the students. You get to give help and guidance. You can offer career advice, spiritual advice and even sometimes you can help them with dating. You get to see them grow, and that’s really neat.”

Read more of this story.

CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY | COMPUTER SCIENCE | GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES
MATHEMATICS | MATHEMATICS EDUCATION | PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY | STATISTICS

For more information about the college, contact Lynn Patten at lynn_patten@byu.edu.
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