The

DEAN’S MESSAGE

DEPT. NEWS

Welcome to this month’s edition of the alumni eNewsletter! Halloween is winding down and the candy jars are running low, but the excitement to enjoy turkey and cranberry sauce is in the air. As the spirit of Thanksgiving begins to linger, we here at the college can’t help but be grateful for the many blessings we’ve been given. In this season of giving and gratitude, I would like to thank each of you for all you do to help not only your alma mater but also the science world as a whole. We’ve come a long way because of your generous contributions, and so we’d like to tell you a bit about where we are.

Just recently, we visited with the College Volunteer Leadership Council at Timp Lodge, where we reported that overall, the college is doing very well. In the past year, the number of students in our seven departments has increased by 10%! Although an increasing number of students brings challenges to accommodate the growth, it also brings opportunities, so we are excited about this new development. This means more students learning to think analytically. More students learning to investigate deeply. More students doing mentored research. More students getting hands-on experience. And more students becoming life-long learners.

But along with the increase of students, we’ve also seen an increase in your efforts to help us achieve our goal of raising money for both undergraduate and graduate studies in the sciences. Our endowment fundraising has already raised more than one and a half million dollars! This is just one more reason for us to be grateful this Thanksgiving season. We are still aiming towards the mark of raising $10 million for undergraduate studies, as well as $10 million for graduate studies. We know that with your help, we will reach our goal and help change the lives and ambitions of our students in the sciences.

Our college also has a lot of exciting events coming up. Clubs and groups throughout our college will host engaging, scientific events throughout the month of November, and if you are in the area, I encourage you to attend as many as you can.

I look forward to working with you to enhance our students’ experiences here at CPMS. I know that when we work together to improve our students’ education, we’re improving our future as well.

COLLEGE
Upcoming November Events
CVLC
Leadership Council Getting Involved
CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY
Soaking up Cancer Research
Measuring Disease and Molecules
COMPUTER SCIENCE
Making Math Computable
MATHEMATICS
From Austria to BYU
PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY
Science and Religion: A Love Story
COLLEGE LINKS
CPMS Homepage
Giving to the College
CPMS on Facebook
CPMS on Twitter
LinkedIn
CPMStv
FRONTIERS MAGAZINE
Fall/Winter 2012 Issue & Videos
   


Photo: Courtesy of Todd Berenger

 


PHYSICS ALUM GIVEN PRESIDENTIAL AWARD

It’s not everyday that a cougar shakes hands with the president of the United States.

Recently, President Obama honored 96 exceptional scientists with the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. Physics alum, Dr. Matthew Squires, represented both the Department of Defense and his alma mater BYU in his acceptance of the award.

“BYU gave me a great opportunity to get hands-on experience working in a lab as an undergraduate,” he said. “That’s gone with me through my undergraduate career up until now.”

A scientist working for the Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate, Kirtland Air Force Base, N.M., Squires toured The White House and even shook hands with President Obama while on his trip to Washington, D.C., to receive the award.

“Discoveries in science and technology not only strengthen our economy, they inspire us as a people,” President Obama said to the award recipients, according to a news release on The White House website. “The impressive accomplishments of today’s awardees so early in their careers promise even greater advances in the years ahead.”

Squires researched the use of lasers to cool atoms to near absolute zero and then trap cold atoms to more accurately measure motion and time. Through this research, he came up with a much cheaper and faster way to perform cold atom experiments, also called an atom chip.

Squires’ supervisor nominated him for the award, which was based on both scientific achievements and community service.

 

Read more of this story.

CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY | COMPUTER SCIENCE | GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES
MATHEMATICS | MATHEMATICS EDUCATION | PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY | STATISTICS

For more information about the college, contact Lynn Patten at lynn_patten@byu.edu.
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