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Welcome to the October edition of the eNewsletter. Homecoming is now upon us yet again, and we're hoping to see many of you back in Provo for the festivities. We are excited about the many events we have planned during Homecoming week, and we invite you to come and participate in as many as you possibly can.

Ed Gholdston, a BYU graduate and program manager at Hamilton Sundstrand currently working on the NASA "spacecraft of the future," will present the college's Honored Alumni Lecture on October 7th at 11:00 a.m. in 1170 TMCB. His presentation, "Space: Exploring the High Frontier with Humans, Robots, and Telescopes," will cover some of the key events and programs in space exploration and will delve into several topics — including current and future manned mission, satellites and robotic probes, and advances in deep-space astronomy. (For more information on Bro. Gholdston's lecture, see this month's feature story below.)

Likewise, businessman and scientific philanthropist David Derrick will present the annual Summerhays Lecture on Thursday, October 7th at 7:00 p.m. in the Royden G. Derrick Planetarium in the Eyring Science Center. His lecture, titled "Time and Entropy," will appeal to the everyday person as it explores the relationship entropy has with time and mortality. (You can learn more about Bro. Derrick and this year's Summerhays Lecture by clicking here.)

Both of these events will provide attendees with an engaging look into a variety of fascinating topics. We are excited to be able to present these two knowledgeable and excellent speakers to our students, alumni and friends, and we encourage you to attend their presentations and learn from their wealth of experiences.

But that's not all Homecoming has to offer. There will also be a variety of other fun activities going on across campus all week long. You can see a full list of college events by visiting our CPMS alumni portal here, and you can also check out the university's festivities by clicking here.

Here at CPMS, we want to continue to build and strengthen our relationship with our college alumni long after you've moved on from school and into your respective careers. We hope to continue that important process this week, and we look forward to seeing many of you right back here where it all began.

As always, thank you for your continued support of the college. We look forward to keeping in touch in new and exciting ways.

CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY
National Chemistry Week
MATHEMATICS
Award Winning Professor Makes Impact
PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY
Philanthropist to Deliver Summerhays Lecture
Did Ancient Greeks See Halley's Comet?
STATISTICS
Statistics Professor Wins Award for
Life's Work
COLLEGE LINKS
CPMS Homepage
Giving to the College
SOCIAL MEDIA
CPMS on Facebook
CPMS on Twitter
Linkedin
CPMStv
HANDS ON
Hands On: Courtside with Statistics Dinosaur Land Webisode

MANAGER FOR NASA PROJECT TO DELIVER HONORED ALUMNI LECTURE

A deputy program manager working on NASA's spacecraft of the future will give this year's College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (CPMS) Honored Alumni Lecture Oct. 7.

Ed Gholdston has spent the last four years working on “Orion,” a Crew Exploration Vehicle that could take astronauts to the Moon and Mars. He will be lecturing on “Space: Exploring the High Frontier with Humans, Robots, and Telescopes.”

Gholdston's lecture will cover some of the key events and programs in space exploration and will explore topics including current and future manned missions, satellites and robotic probes and advances in deep-space astronomy.

Born and raised in Orlando, Florida, Gholdston spent his childhood living some 30 miles from Cape Canaveral. He earned a B.S. in physics from Florida State in 1969 and a Ph.D. in plasma and theoretical physics from BYU in 1982.

Gholdston began his career at Texas Instruments, where he worked in a microwave lab. In 1985 he joined United Technologies Corporation, where he headed a team of engineers and scientists in designing and constructing power system hardware for the International Space Station.

He is currently working to create key elements of the Orion spacecraft's electrical power system. When complete, the Crew Exploration Vehicle will replace the Space Shuttle.

more...
CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY | COMPUTER SCIENCE | GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES
MATHEMATICS | MATHEMATICS EDUCATION | PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY | STATISTICS

For more information about the college, contact Lynn Patten at lynn_patten@byu.edu.
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